Taiwanese Braised Meat Sauce

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You can find this dish everywhere in Taiwan. It’s another Taiwanese comfort-food.

Taiwanese people take their aromatics seriously. It’s a lot of fried shallots, dried shrimps, dried Shiitake mushrooms, garlic…etc. As H says, you can have some serious “strong” breath afterwards. Always keep a pack of gum with you if you ever travel to Taiwan. :p Nevertheless, the fried shallots in this dish gives the dish an amazing flavor. You can buy this in most Asian supermarkets. In case you’re not sure what to look for, this is what it looks like:

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I never really appreciated this dish growing up. In fact, I never really liked it before. This wasn’t until after having E and S when we started hosting quite a bit of large group gatherings at our house. A lot of times, it’s hard to prep for dinners let alone large groups of guests. My mom gave me this idea as she is quite gifted in the kitchen. It’s easy, inexpensive, and you can make ahead of time. In fact, the longer it simmers, the better it tastes. I will often serve this with a pot of freshly steamed rice and a side of veggies. The meat sauce is good as leftover the next day, too. It’s tasty with noodles, as the noodles will absorb some of the broth. My kids like this with macaroni pasta. I know. It’s quite weird, but macaronis are easier for them to eat then long noodles. It also makes it easier for me to clean up afterwards.

These days, anything that’s easy and make-ahead is a keeper around here.

 

Taiwanese Braised Meat Sauce

Serves 4-6

 

Ingredients:

1 pound ground pork

1/2 cup soy sauce

2 cups water

1 tablespoon rice wine

3 tablespoons fried shallots

 

Directions:

1. Brown the ground pork in a saute pan over medium high heat while breaking up the meat into smaller pieces with a wooden spoon or spatula. (I typically don’t use oil as the ground pork is quite fatty and will release oil as it cooks.)

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2. When the meat is almost cooked-through, add water, soy sauce, rice wine, and fried shallots. Bring to a boil, cover, then simmer over low heat for approximately 30 minutes.

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3. Serve over rice, noodles, or steamed/boiled veggies.

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4 comments
  1. This dish sounds easy and oh so comforting – it’s something I will definitely try soon. I miss Chinese food so much since I came home from my semester abroad in Shanghai, and sadly my Taiwanese flatmate moved out last year and does not make a huge pot of mapo doufu every other week.

  2. nora said:

    This is one of our household favorites, too! And it freezes well, so I usually make a big batch and freeze half for another meal. I also like to make sweet potato rice to go with it and my kids like that, too. Love your pictures!

  3. Meredith said:

    Looks good. Is this the same as the minced pork dish I order at Bento? Wonder if it will taste just as good if I use ground turkey instead of ground pork.

    • In Taiwan, it’s typically made with ground pork. Our Publix generally carries decent ground pork. :) I am not a fan of ground turkey.

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